Diary from an uncertain time

Friends, I’m not sure I have anything new to offer that hasn’t already been said. Everyone I know is worried about something – aging parents, incomes or sudden lack of incomes, those working in health care or grocery stores, isolation, parenting, you name it.

I have found some spots of humor. Who knew I would be talking to my parents about how many rolls of toilet paper they have?

I’m working from home, Eddie’s business is closed, the kids are home. Our new cat, Freddy, is loving the family time. (It’s a good time to have a new pet.) Sweet highs and hard lows give the day a rhythm.

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One of the highlights of our week: Freddy got on the bed! He’s on the left, Lion is in the middle, Max is on the right. 🙂 

Technology – the thing I’m usually fighting about with my kids – has been helpful. Max and Calvin had a Zoom chat with their bell choir yesterday – they loved reconnecting with these friends.

I let Max FaceTime and play a game with another friend. Listening to their conversation while I was working was hilarious.

“Should we make these two horses have a baby?” I head Max say.

Our neighborhood kids are doing a daily LEGO challenge and texting the images to each other through the parents. I connected with two friends on a Zoom chat. It’s all helping.

I’m posting more on my Instagram channel @DistractedbyFashionCincy for a fun…distraction.

Now for the books

The day our libraries closed, Calvin and I went to our branch in its last hour. Was this smart? I don’t know. I wiped off all the books with Clorox wipes. They were already not accepting returns as that point.

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Our last library hall. Lint Boy is one of our favorites. 

Reading has always soothed me. Since things shut down, I’ve read The Dutch House by Ann Patchett. (My book club met her once, yes we did.) I’m currently reading and liking This Will Only Hurt A Little by Busy Phillips. It’s one of the books I picked up on our library dash – it’s fun, a good distraction, and has serious moments.

My kids are making their way through their own books again. Calvin is revisiting favorites like Be Prepared by Vera Brogsol and Smile by Raina Telgemeier (Calvin and saw her in the fall.) Max is rereading the Wimpy Kids series by Jeff Kinney.

What are you reading?

If you’re up to it, send me your thoughts. I’d love to share in this space. Trashy novels, kids books, magazines, let me know.

Buying books?

If you are in the market for books right now, Downbound Books (a lovely new store) is closed but selling. Read the owner’s statement, Bummer Camp.

 Joseph-Beth and Carmichael’s are both shipping books.

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Another kid on my pink bed. This one is reading Big Nate’s Greatest Hits. And his sweatshirt is coordinating with the decor. 

 

 

 

 

Who knew reading went with farts?

My favorite activity on earth is reading in my bed, a kid on each side.

One evening, I was reading Three Junes by Julia Glass. Max and Calvin were both engrossed in Dav Pilkey’s Dog Man books.

“Look Mama, all his jokes are about diarrhea,” Max laughed.

I looked over at the graphic novel and saw a cute kitten telling diarrhea jokes.

I would turn back to my book and then Calvin would show me something equally hilarious.

There is a lot of silliness in the Dog Man books – the premise being a man and a dog that had an unfortunate accident, turning them into the super-powered Dog Man. Their foe is an evil cat. There are also people that act dumb, explosions, all the stuff that is simple, gross and funny.

Author and artist Dav Pilkey knows his audience. My kids can’t get enough. Calvin has all the books and is always excited about the new ones.

Max and Cavlin

“Ok, Mama, we’ll pose for your photo.”

They sit on either side of me and cackle and I have to laugh too. It reminds me of when I read David Sedaris books and laugh out loud.

But did I mention the farts?

There’s a lot of farting as they read, adding to the hilarity. (For them.)

It’s time for bed and Dog Man has them wound up and after going through the nightly ritual of bedtime negotiations, I go back to my bed to read the elegant Three Junes.

My bed smells like farts.

It’s gross but I have to admit, it was a good night.

As I was writing this post, Calvin was upstairs laughing. Eddie asked, “What’s so funny?”

Max’s answer: “He’s he’s reading Dog Man.”

Graphic novels are real books

My friend Michael says Raina Telgemeier’s books grow with age. He’s referring to the spines that crack and pages that expand with each reading.

Her graphic novels are reread because they are that good! She shares stories of her own childhood/teen years that are relatable and entertaining. Challenges with siblings, friends, dentists…it’s all there.

Calvin and agree that Ghosts, is our favorite. It  deals with moving, ancestors and a delicious Day of the Dead story.

We recently saw Raina when Joseph-Beth Booksellers brought her to town to discuss her new book Guts. Calvin had been anticipating the release of this book for months.

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Calvin and our friend, Iris. (Her dad is Michael and he introduced Raina at the event.)

Hearing her talk about her journey and books was a treat ­– for me. I think Calvin liked it. He had his head in the new book most of the time. I would nudge him from time to time but since he was content, I mostly left him alone. He was too busy devouring the book.

I loved what Raina had to say to her young fans (and old) about books.

“Graphic novels are real reading,” Raina said. “They have all the elements of a book.”

She also mentioned that reading makes you feel less alone – so true!

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We went to the event with our friend, Stella! She’s a connoisseur of graphic novels and told us about Raina’s visit.

A few weeks later, my niece Margot and I had a great discussion about Guts and Raina’s other books. It was like an aunt-niece book club!

It’s not the first time Calvin and Margot have enjoyed the same books – revisit one of my old blog posts, Kissing cousins and being weird is cool.

And check out Raina Telgemeier!

 

Meet The Beatles

One of my favorite Christmas memories is from the fourth grade. I walk downstairs to our olive-green, shag-carpeted living room to see what Santa has left. I hear music from The Beatles’ Yellow Submarine.

This was the 70s and having a stereo was a big deal. Imagine my amazement when my dad pointed out that behind the blue suede (yes, blue suede!) chair was a record player/stereo, complete with an 8-track. Playing my favorite band, The Beatles.

That stereo brought years of enjoyment – I even lugged the enormous thing to college. My family grew our music collection through a mail order business that sold 8-tracks or for those of you from Cincinnati, trips to Swallen’s.

Max and Calvin started the fourth grade this year and while their listening methods are different – they have Alexas – they have been digging The Beatles after seeing the film Yesterday this summer. (I cried through half the movie.)

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Max has been digging my newest Beatles book.

Max, in particular, has become obsessed. He asks me lots of questions, “What was the Beatles’ first song?” “Why did they break up?” “How did John die?” “How did George die?” “Did they stay friends after they broke up?”

On vacation in Canada this summer, he adopted a British accent, calling us “mate.” He tried to tell me that Abbey Road is in Liverpool…not London.

But his mama schooled him – I did take a 300 level class at Indiana University (much to my dad’s dismay) – The History of the Beatles. Best class ever, besides The History of Rock n’ Roll. I also lived in London and traveled with my brother to visit Liverpool for the day and missed all the tours because we slept so late. (But that’s another story.)

Where do books factor into all of this? Well, once I had a captive audience, you can bet I brought out all of my many Beatles’ books that I’ve collected and been gifted throughout the years, including a new one my husband bought me for my recent birthday, The Complete Beatles Songs, The stories behind every track written by the Fab Four by Steve Turner.

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Some of my collection. I think a couple of these were bought in my teens.

This book is Max’s favorite because he can look up the origin of each song and chatter to me about it. At night, I hear him singing “Eleanor Rigby “in his bed.

It’s pretty sweet. I plan to enjoy it until he turns into a teenager and scoffs at my choices.

Check out this book for kids about The Beatles: Who Were the Beatles? by Geoff Edgers and illustrated by Jeremy Tugeau. Max loved it.

Just for fun, I’m including a photo of another birthday present – a painting by Tobin Sprout. I wrote about him when I first started this blog.

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My brother Paul gave me this awesome birthday gift – a painting by Tobin Sprout of GBV. It’s a double header!

Book reports are the worst but reading is cool

These days, it’s hard to get my kiddos to succumb to an interview about why they liked a book.

(They aren’t as interested in my blog and there’s some attitude sneaking in. Help!)

So, I try to pay attention to what’s popular at my house.

In the last two months, Brad Meltzer’s “I am” books have made a resurgence. This was thanks to the school assignment to present on a famous woman or African-American at school.

Honestly, I hate these school reports. It’s a constant exercise in nagging and vigilance.

And even with these supreme parenting skills, I still found myself working on a PowerPoint when I had the flu in December. That’s right – lying in bed, looking up information on rocks, trying to make my kid do the work but get it done.

But I digress.

This last report was a little better because Rosa Parks (Calvin) and Helen Keller (Max) are pretty interesting. (Not that elements aren’t interesting.) It also revived their love for Meltzer’s books, illustrated by Christopher Eliopoulos.

Max and Calvin requested that I get ALL THE BOOKS from the library (we own a few). They couldn’t get enough.

“Who wouldn’t like them,” Max said. “They are addicting to read.”

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Max checks out the latest haul from the library.

Calvin had no comment but he would read these books in bed learning about Sacagawea, Billie Jean King, Neil Armstrong, Harriet Tubman, Abraham Lincoln, Lucille Ball and more.

I like these books because they often tackle tough subjects with a simple and straightforward approach. I’m pretty open with my kids about the tough stuff but sometimes a little help is welcome. Civil Rights is addressed in “I am Martin Luther King, Jr.” Gender equality in “I am Billie Jean King.” Slavery is discussed in “I am Abraham Lincoln” and “I am Lucille Ball” addresses how she persevered over a tough childhood.

That’s the beauty of these books. The subjects – Jackie Robinson, Jane Goodall, Albert Einstein – overcome obstacles and succeed.

I enjoy reading them myself. As Max says, who wouldn’t want to read them?

But I am happy summer is on the horizon and that means no more reports.

 

 

Technology is the enemy and how I (still try) to get my kids to read

Can I have the phone? Can I have the phone? Can I have the phone?

This common refrain around our house drives me nuts, leads to fights, general grumpiness and lectures.

As a family that has avoided technology with our kids – at some point the lure of video games and my phone became a part of our daily life.

Do I regret this?

Yes.

Do I admit that sometimes it gives me time to get things done or just have some peace? Or time to read my own books?

Yes.

I want my kids to read – after all, I have a book blog and reading is my favorite pastime. But its something we have to work on.

Calvin reads in bed every night – just like his mama. I love how he keeps his favorites/current selections in a pile at the end of his bed. Max sometimes reads in bed but often falls asleep when his head hits the pillow.

I recently revisited my 2015 post How I Get My Kids to Read because I was thinking about all this.

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A good day – we stopped at the downtown library and they read on the streetcar!

It seems back then the TV was my obstacle. This made me feel better.

I realized I use some of the same tactics:

  1. We still go to bookstores.
  2. We still go to the library but now the library computers beckon. I combat this by picking out books for them or making them get a book before using the computer. Or we visit the downtown library to mix things up.
  3. I used to pick them up from school with surprise books tailored to their interests. I no longer pick them up so now I stop on my way home from work. Calvin loves graphic novels. Max loves animal, sports and Jeff Kinney’s Wimpy Kid books. They both love Guinness Book of World Record kid books and anything with amazing facts.

Sometimes it works.

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Sometimes new books do the trick. Believe it or not, this was Christmas day.

Here’s what doesn’t work like it used too:

  1. They no longer seem as interested in my blog. Maybe at age 9, it’s not so cool that mama has a blog.
  2. We still read together in my bed but when I tried it last week, they fought about needing more space for their growing (and more stinky) bodies.

It’s a series of successes and failures:

  1. Fails – I tried to get them to listen to me reading Harry Potter out loud. Calvin would rather read to himself. Max, I think, was doing it just for me.
  2. Win – Sometimes they bring up books in real life. Calvin and I read Little White Duck  by Na Lui and he brought it up one day when we were talking about China.
  3. Win – Christmas morning they actually cuddled up and read their new books.

I think that equates to technology – one, mama – two.

What do you do to get your kids to read? Let me know – maybe it’s another blog post!

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Calvin was happy he got this book for Christmas. (Maybe I should have asked for a lampshade!)

Ruthie and the werewolves

I met ten-year-old Ruthie for the first time last May. This is hard to believe since she is the daughter of my dear friend Eloise.

I traveled to Greensboro, NC this fall to visit the Porter clan  – Eloise, Logan (dad), Mary Mac, Francis, Logan (son) and Ruthie. It may have been difficult for Ruthie to contribute to the conversation since her mom and I DO NOT STOP talking when we see each other, plus her three older siblings were with us as well.

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Mary Mac, Francis and Ruthie.

Ruthie does have a lot to contribute and a cool haircut and engaging personality to match!

Fortunately for me, I got some time alone with her when we went to a local bookstore, Scuppernong Books, on Saturday night. We visited the graphic novel section together and compared notes.

Ruthie picked out How to Slay a Werewolf: Professor Van Helsing’s Guides by Miles Teves and sat down at dinner and didn’t look up. That’s the sign of a good book and a true reader! (I picked up Anne Hood’s Morningstar: Growing up with Books. I recommend it and anything she’s written.)

Ruthie was kind enough to answer some questions her new book.

What made you pick out this book? 

I picked it because I have an interest in fantasy, but not cutesy fantasy. It isn’t dark and creepy but something kind of inbetween.

It seemed like you couldn’t put it down – you read it all through dinner – that’s the sign of a good book!  What made it so interesting? 

It’s a funny reference book about werewolves. It talked about a lot of things I didn’t know about werewolves. I like how the book’s werewolves compared to werewolves in different fantasy realms. Like in Harry Potter, werewolves cannot change on command and cannot be killed by silver, but in this book they can. I like how there are illustrations.

Did you have a favorite part? 

My favorite part was the advertisement for a silver trap. It was funny because it said things it contained and none of them are silver.

Can you tell me about some of your other favorite books and why they are your favorites? 

The Harry Potter series because I like the mix of fantasy and real life problems. Harry was struggling with a lot of the same issues kids do …. Like trying not to be self centered, and getting angry at people without understanding they sometimes cannot control it.

Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo is one of my favorites because it shows the power of animals in a family, but that change doesn’t happen straight away. It also shows that friends can be found anywhere. I like how the author just shows Opal’s everyday life without forcing problems on her. For example when the librarian told her about her grandfather’s candy (Litmus lozenges).

G-man graphic novels by Chris Giarrusso are some of my favorite reads because they are funny yet realistic about being the youngest child. He gets pushed around but he has super powers .. which is not normal.

I also like the Mighty Skullboy graphic novels by Jacob Chabot because they are super funny because he’s a little Kindergartner who wants to be a villain, Skullboy. But when he comes to class his teacher thinks the name Skullboy is french.

G-man and Skullboy books

Ruthie showed me some of her favorite books.

Why do you like reading? 

It’s a mix of the standard generic answer and my reasoning:  It’s not like the book takes me places, but it allows me to experience things in fantasy that I could never experience in real life.

Anything else you want to share? 

Books don’t just help you academically they also help you with your imagination which is needed not only as kids but also as grown ups.

Even businessmen, which sometimes seems boring, need imagination. For better advertisements when they need more business.

Thanks, Ruthie!

Ruthie’s mom, Eloise, was my first guest blogger when she wrote about Fly High! The Story of Bessie Coleman.

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Ruthie and Julia.